144. The Moon is Down- John Steinbeck

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Title: The Moon is Down

Author: John Steinbeck

Rating: ★★★★

On the Shelves: Fiction> Classic/Historical Fiction/Historical

Originally published at the zenith of Nazi Germany’s power, Steinbeck’s fable “The Moon Is Down” explores the effects of invasion on both the conquered and the conquerors. Occupied by enemy troops, a small, peaceable town comes face-to-face with evil imposed from the outside and betrayal from within the close-knit community. As he delves into the motivations and emotions of the enemy, Steinbeck uncovers profound and often unsettling truths both about war and human nature.

(Goodreads 2015)

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134. Cranford- Elizabeth Gaskell

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Title: Cranford

Author: Elizabeth Gaskell

Rating: ★★

On the Shelves: Fiction> Classics

Cranford is an affectionate and often moving portrait of genteel poverty and intertwined lives in a nineteenth-century village. One of Elizabeth Gaskell’s most beloved works, it centres on a community dominated by women and governed by old-fashioned ways. The formidable Miss Deborah Jenkyns and the kindly Miss Matty’s days revolve around card games, tea, thriftiness and an endless appetite for scandal, until change comes into their world – whether it is the modern ideas of Captain Brown, a bank collapse, rumours of burglars or an unexpected reappearance from the past. (Goodreads 2014)

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128. All Quiet on the Western Front- Erich Maria Remarque

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Title: All Quiet on the Western Front

Author: Erich Maria Remarque

Rating: ★★★★

On the Shelves: Fiction> Classics

One by one the boys begin to fall…

In 1914 a room full of German schoolboys, fresh-faced and idealistic, are goaded by their schoolmaster to troop off to the ‘glorious war’. With the fire and patriotism of youth they sign up. What follows is the moving story of a young ‘unknown soldier’ experiencing the horror and disillusionment of life in the trenches. (Goodreads 2014)

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123. The Man who was Thursday- G.K Chesterton

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Title: The Man who was Thursday

Author: G.K Chesterton

Rating: ★★

On the Shelves: Fiction> Classics

‘”A man’s brain is a bomb,” he cried out, loosening suddenly his strange passion and striking his own skull with violence. “My brain feels like a bomb, night and day. It must expand! It must expand! A man’s brain must expand, if it breaks up the universe”‘

In a park in London, secret policeman Gabriel Syme strikes up a conversation with an anarchist. Sworn to do his duty, Syme uses his new acquaintance to go undercover in Europe’s Central Anarchist Council and infiltrate their deadly mission, even managing to have himself voted to the position of ‘Thursday’. When Syme discovers another undercover policeman on the Council, however, he starts to question his role in their operations. And as a desperate chase across Europe begins, his confusion grows, as well as his confidence in his ability to outwit his enemies. But he has still to face the greatest terror that the Council has: a man named Sunday, whose true nature is worse than Syme could ever have imagined (Goodreads 2014)

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110. A Room of One’s Own- Virginia Woolf

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Title: A Room of One’s Own

Author: Virginia Woolf

Rating: ★★★★

On the Shelves: Non-Fiction> Classics

A Room of One’s Own is an extended essay by Virginia Woolf. First published on 24 October 1929, the essay was based on a series of lectures she delivered at Newnham College and Girton College, two women’s colleges at Cambridge University in October 1928. While this extended essay in fact employs a fictional narrator and narrative to explore women both as writers of and characters in fiction, the manuscript for the delivery of the series of lectures, titled “Women and Fiction”, and hence the essay, are considered non-fiction. The essay is generally seen as a feminist text, and is noted in its argument for both a literal and figural space for women writers within a literary tradition dominated by patriarchy (Goodreads 2014)

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Friday’s Fairy tales: Rapunzel

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TADA! Friday’s Fairytales is back after a nearly two month long hiatus!

Did you miss it? I know I did! I think I might make this feature a fortnightly one so I don’t get too bogged down over it, which seems to be what happened last time- but we’ll see.

This week’s tale is Rapunzel!

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95. North and South- Elizabeth Gaskell

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Title: North and South

Author: Elizabeth Gaskell

Rating: ★★★★

On the Shelves: Fiction> Classics

North and South depicts a young woman discovering herself, in a nuanced portrayal of what divides people, and what brings them together.

Elizabeth Gaskell’s compassionate, richly dramatic novel features one of the most original and fully-rounded female characters in Victorian fiction, Margaret Hale. It shows how, forced to move from the country to an industrial town, she develops a passionate sense of social justice, and a turbulent relationship with mill-owner John Thornton. (Goodreads 2014)

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86. Breakfast at Tiffany’s – Truman Capote

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Title: Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Author: Truman Capote

Rating:  

On the Shelves: Fiction> Classics

 

It’s New York in the 1940s, where the martinis flow from cocktail hour till breakfast at Tiffany’s. And nice girls don’t, except, of course, Holly Golightly. Pursued by Mafia gangsters and playboy millionaires, Holly is a fragile eyeful of tawny hair and turned-up nose, a heart-breaker, a perplexer, a traveller, a tease. She is irrepressibly ‘top banana in the shock department’, and one of the shining flowers of American fiction. (Goodreads 2014)

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Austen August Read-a-Long: Update 1

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Since I decided to dedicate Sundays to “Austen August”posts, I figured I’d start now and just provide weekly updates on how things are going. For those who have no idea what I’m on about, the introduction post is HERE.

Basically in August, I will be hosting a read-a-long of Pride and Prejudice! Everybody and Anybody is welcome to join in, I have also set up a goodreads group page. Tell everybody because it’s going to be fun! The read-a-long will take place throughout the entire month of august, starting on 1st-31st August. More of the intial details in the introduction post, linked above.

It’s looking promising so far, the goodreads group has 27 members and the general introductions board is already flowing with love for this novel. We  have a couple of Austen newbies on the board,  who are choosing to read the novel with us for the very first time, very exciting! I’ve had a couple of people say they also want to read the other books I will be reading in the month, which are Austen based (The Mysterious Death of Miss Austen, and Longbourn), so if you would like to do so, again feel free!

I’m very excited by the number of people who have shown interest in this, I was only expecting maybe five or six to want to participate! I’m floored that there are 27 people who want to at least give it a go! I’m toying with the idea of doing another read-a-long if this one is successful, maybe for Northanger Abbey or Jane Eyre towards November/December…

Austen August- a Read-A-Long Proposal

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Ahhhh it’s that time of year again. Cloudy English Summertime, where the heat is too hot and sticky to actually do anything apart from sit on the couch or in the garden, perfect reading weather. I always seem to get bitten by the Jane Austen bug around this time of year, which is hilarious considering I loathed studying Austen in sixth form.

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